Change would let developers calculate number of units before setting aside land for roads
Erica Meltzer | Daily Camera

Pierson Concrete workers Beein Castillo, right, and Odell Swecker work on a concrete sidewalk Wednesday at the Violet Crossing development at 13th Street and Violet Avenue in north Boulder. A proposed change to Boulder's land use code would allow developers to make their density calculations before setting aside land for roads. (Jeremy Papasso/Daily Camera)
Pierson Concrete workers Beein Castillo, right, and Odell Swecker work on a concrete sidewalk Wednesday at the Violet Crossing development (Jeremy Papasso/Daily Camera)

If Andy Allison had not had to dedicate roads to the city of Boulder as part of a recent development at 820 Lee Hill Drive, he could have built 38 units instead of 31.

At 1000 Rosewood, a 50 percent affordable housing development, he could have built 23 units instead of 16.

A proposed change to Boulder’s land use code would allow developers to make their density calculations before setting aside land for roads so that they get the same number of units they would be allowed if they didn’t have to dedicate roads.

In a memo to the Planning Board, city planners said the change would encourage development of properties that have remained vacant due to right-of-way requirements and promote more affordable and moderate-income housing.

“It is a huge cost of development,” said Allison, who specializes in affordable housing development but has also done market-rate projects.

He noted that developers not only have to set aside the land but also build the roads and tie up additional money to guarantee the infrastructure. Read more