Tim Logan | Los Angeles Times

Francisco Valdea, left, anda Efrain Trejo work on leveling ground for parking and driveways for homes being built in Echo Park. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
Francisco Valdea, left, anda Efrain Trejo work on leveling ground for parking and driveways for homes being built in Echo Park. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

With Los Angeles facing one of the nation’s worst housing crunches, Mayor Eric Garcetti urged the city to pick up the pace on home building and add 100,000 new homes by 2021. But how?

Hitting the goal Garcetti laid out in a speech last week would mean adding more homes in Los Angeles in each of the next seven years than the city has added in all but one of the last 25.

That will require a grab bag of solutions, including creating dense hubs around transit stations, opening up backyards to extra homes and clearing the city’s sclerotic permitting process, developers, urban planners and housing advocates say. And, they all agree, it’s long overdue.

“This is a gigantic challenge,” said Alan Greenlee, executive director of the Southern California Assn. of Nonprofit Housing. “We historically have not kept up, and the problems are only getting worse.”

While Garcetti’s speech outlined broad ideas about cutting red tape and funding affordable housing, spokespeople for his office said they’re still rolling out specific proposals.

Some include projects already underway, such as rewriting L.A.’s 1940s-era zoning code and streamlining the building permit system. And Thursday, Garcetti asked the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to inventory its property for potential affordable-housing sites and set a goal that 30% of units built on Metro-owned land be affordable. Read more