Roger K. Lewis | The Washington Post

A rendering of the proposed Elizabeth Square development near the downtown Silver Spring Metro station. (Lee Development Group and Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County)
A rendering of the proposed Elizabeth Square development near the downtown Silver Spring Metro station. (Lee Development Group and Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County)

Transit-oriented development, or TOD, is rapidly gaining momentum in the Washington region and will likely become a  key component in this area’s efforts to address traffic congestion, pollution and quality-of-life issues.

TOD has become the dominant public- and private-1sector planning strategy for real estate development and redevelopment throughout the metropolitan area and isn’t limited to downtown Washington. TOD projects are under way or being envisioned in Maryland and Virginia counties.

Arlington County’s Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, with five Orange Line Metro stations, remains the foremost TOD example in this region. Metro stations are the anchors for TOD strategies and tactics guiding the multi-decade makeover of Tysons in Fairfax County; redevelopment of White Flint, Twinbrook and Wheaton in Montgomery County; and planning for New Carollton in Prince George’s County.

Transit-oriented development is driven in part by real estate market forces and changing demographics. Studies show  that single-person households are now the most common household type, and that young adults as well as seniors prefer living in pedestrian-oriented, urban-style communities served by transit. Thus, several key attributes typify and characterize transit-oriented development. Read more